Final Fight 2 — Issue 38

Cap­com brawler takes fight worldwide

As a child of the early ’90s, Final Fight not only increased my addic­tion to arcade games, but also intro­duced me fur­ther to Capcom’s sky­rock­et­ing rise as a game devel­oper. I dived into Final Fight 2 to relive my arcade glory days.

In Final Fight 2, time has passed since Mike Hag­gar, Cody Tra­vers and Cody’s friend Guy defeated the Mad Gear gang, restored peace to the streets of Metro City and res­cued Haggar’s daugh­ter Jes­sica from the Mad Gear’s leader, Bel­ger. That peace is short-lived when the rem­nants of Mad Gear return under a new leader and kid­nap Guy’s fiancée, Rena, and Guy’s sen­sei, Genryusai.

With Cody away on a trip with Jes­sica and Guy away on secret train­ing, Hag­gar is joined by Rena’s sis­ter, Maki, and Haggar’s friend Car­los Miyamoto on a world­wide quest to crush the Mad Gear and res­cue Rena and Gen­ryu­sai. FF2 has a lot going for it; it’s a direct sequel never released in arcades with a lot of new mate­r­ial despite no new gen­eral mechanics.

FF2 has an expanded bat­tle­field with Hag­gar, Maki and Car­los start­ing their jour­ney in Hong Kong and end­ing that jour­ney in Japan. The main pro­tag­o­nists make their way through sev­eral locales in Europe in their search for Rena, all the while sur­rounded by improved graph­ics over the first game. The back­grounds are high qual­ity, and the sprites are well-drawn and crisp for each char­ac­ter with a lot of atten­tion to detail.

The atten­tion to detail also shows up in the con­trols. Over­all, con­trol is sim­ple even though each char­ac­ter has a unique fight­ing style. Hag­gar still has his pro wrestling moves, Maki makes use of Nin­jitsu and Car­los prac­tices mar­tial arts and sword skills. Though they are generic in exe­cu­tion, it’s fun to see how each char­ac­ter oper­ates dur­ing the fight.

Power-ups are still obtained via smash­ing var­i­ous objects and range from steamed Chi­nese buns to a pair of shoes that can increase health or score points. Find­ing either a Gen­ryu­sai or Guy doll will give an extra life or invin­ci­bil­ity. As for the music, it is arcade per­fect just like its pre­de­ces­sor. It’s a nice sound­track of early Cap­com brawler, and it fits the action per­fectly in each of the game’s locations.

As much as I enjoyed FF2, the game does have some flaws. While each char­ac­ter has their own awe­some spe­cial moves, using them does cost health. That’s annoy­ing when you’re try­ing to use more pow­er­ful moves to defeat bosses and try­ing not to die at the same time. Also, dur­ing the timed bonus stages, con­trol is hit or miss when strik­ing objects; if it’s not done per­fectly, you lose the bonus points. I also got frus­trated when I couldn’t take the weapons I found into other areas. That cheap­ens the use of the weapon and makes it use­less shortly after pick­ing it up. And, the chal­lenge level is ridicu­lous. I needed a cheat code just to get to the real end­ing in expert mode. It’s too easy to die and tak­ing hits from off-screen ene­mies is terrible.

Final Fight 2 placed the series in the ranks of Capcom’s top-tier fran­chises. While it hasn’t seen the level of push of say, Street Fighter or Res­i­dent Evil, the beat-’em-up is fondly remem­bered as one of Capcom’s crown­ing achievements.

https://youtu.be/a4MOiv7R0el

J-Stars Victory Plus — 3Q2020 issue

Jump into this fan­tas­tic anime series brawler

If you’re a manga afi­cionado like me, you’ve heard of Shonen Jump mag­a­zine. For 50 years, Japan-based pub­lisher Shueisha Inc. brought to the world to leg­endary char­ac­ters such as Son Goku, Mon­key D. Luffy and Naruto Uzi­maki. With these char­ac­ters and their respec­tive series, they became overnight hits in Japan with var­i­ous movies, mer­chan­dise (includ­ing video games) and sep­a­rate graphic nov­els. It was only a mat­ter of time that the SJ phe­nom­e­non would branch out to the rest of the world being pub­lished in var­i­ous lan­guages includ­ing Eng­lish. Shonen Jump, undis­put­edly, has become the stan­dard of intro­duc­ing new anime and manga series. J-Stars Vic­tory VS+ is an exam­ple of that stan­dard.

Pub­lished by Namco Bandai and co-developed with Spike Chun­soft, J-Stars takes more than 50 char­ac­ters from 32 series within the Shonen Jump uni­verse and pits them against each other in var­i­ous loca­tions within each SJ series. The story mode con­sists of each SJ char­ac­ter prepar­ing for the “Jump Bat­tle Tour­na­ment,” devised by the god of Jump World to deter­mine its strongest cham­pi­ons who will defend it from evil forces pos­ing as strong fight­ers.

Within the story mode there are four arcs: Dynamic with Luffy, Hope with Naruto, Inves­ti­ga­tion with Toriko and Goku and Pur­suit with Ichigo. Regard­less of the arc you choose, your char­ac­ter and their respec­tive com­rades will face off against oth­ers to obtain essen­tial parts for your pro­vided ship and badges required to enter the tour­na­ment. I like the story mode, and I also like that the arcade ver­sus mode is an option when you just want to pit char­ac­ters against each other to see who would win.
Con­trol is sim­ple, which has your char­ac­ters roam free dur­ing bat­tle to pull off their sig­na­ture moves along with a Dragon Ball-styled map to track the battle’s progress. How­ever, the down­side is the game cam­era: It moves wildly about and con­stantly requires adjust­ment. At the end of each suc­cess­ful bat­tle, your char­ac­ters not only gain expe­ri­ence points, but also gain cur­rency called “jump coins,” which upgrades skills and cloth­ing and unlocks var­i­ous theme music and addi­tional char­ac­ters to strengthen your team.

All of the sound in the game is cour­tesy of Namco Bandai’s excel­lent sound depart­ment and the use of Dolby Dig­i­tal. There isn’t an Eng­lish voice track in J-Stars, but the Japan­ese voice track for each char­ac­ter is per­formed per­fectly, as if you’re watch­ing a Shonen Jump anime. J-Stars Vic­tory VS+ is per­fect for an anime con­ven­tion tour­na­ment or if you want to spend a day with friends immers­ing your­selves in Shonen Jump lore.

This anime-infused brawler is another tes­ta­ment to Shonen Jump’s recog­ni­tion of being a leader in global pop cul­ture and how anime and manga are quickly becom­ing visual arts that aren’t just for kids.

Fun facts

  • J-Stars Vic­tory+ was billed as the “ulti­mate Jump game,” com­bin­ing past and newer jump titles.
  • Unlike “Tat­sunoko vs. Cap­com: Cross Gen­er­a­tion of Heroes,” licens­ing for all the Jump char­ac­ters was not a seri­ous issue. Accord­ing to pro­ducer Koji Naka­jima, the real prob­lem was deter­min­ing actions for char­ac­ters that do not fight. Solv­ing this prob­lem required numer­ous nego­ti­a­tions with Shueisha and the respected licensee for each series to deter­mine what was and was not accept­able for those characters.
  • J-Stars Vic­tory VS + intro­duced the “new class” of SJ series such as The Dis­as­trous Life of Saiki K., Gin­tama, To Love Ru and Reborn!. These titles have been licensed for North Amer­ica by var­i­ous anime and manga distributors.