NBA Jam — 3Q2014 issue

Photo cour­tesy of Gamefaqs.com

The old king of the court

NBA Jam was — and still is — an expe­ri­ence. No, that’s not some pre­pos­ter­ous fluff dreamed up by an National Bas­ket­ball Asso­ci­a­tion maven like yours truly. It was truly an expe­ri­ence because if you were around at the time that Jam hit the streets, you’d remem­ber the sheer amount of hype that sur­rounded the arcade release. You’d also remem­ber the hype that came home with it. Was it jus­ti­fied hype? Yes and no.

You see, Jam rep­re­sented the start of the exag­ger­ated sports game era, the type of game where the player ani­ma­tions were over the top and the action just as extreme. Throw in a plethora of secrets — like play­ing as Pres­i­dent Bill Clin­ton — and the hype went into over­drive. The game isn’t bad and it mostly lived up to its billing. The sim­ple setup of two-on-two bas­ket­ball and fast-break bas­ket­ball helped cer­tainly, and the ani­ma­tion isn’t bad at all. The player inter­ac­tion is where it mostly suc­ceeds, actu­ally. At the time,

Photo cour­tesy of NIntendolife.com

there was no other place to get the kind of play that Jam offers: Crazy dunks, the abil­ity to be on fire from great shoot­ing and street ball-type rules. It’s that offer­ing that made it a phe­nom­e­nal success.

Jam doesn’t stum­ble in its race to be an in-your-face baller expe­ri­ence. That street ball player inter­ac­tion means you don’t have to learn much about the game to suc­ceed and play well. The con­trol is sim­ple yet has a layer of depth that means any­one can do well at any skill level. The atmos­phere could be a lit­tle bet­ter with a bet­ter sound­track, but what will make you take notice is the announcer. If there’s any­thing you will remem­ber about the game, it’s Tim Kitzrow shout­ing to the top of his lungs that a man is “on fire” or “BOOMSHAKALAKA.”

The graph­ics, like the sound­track, are noth­ing to get excited about. There’s a sta­tic crowd except for the court­side folk, and then there’s the play­ers. Jam pop­u­lar­ized the over-exaggerated look for play­ers, and it cer­tainly had its uses. It’s not out of place for Jam, and it brings a cer­tain atmos­phere to the action that Jam ben­e­fits from.

If there’s ever a rea­son to play NBA Jam, find it in the car­toon­ish action, sound and look. That’s where the fun is, and the main rea­sons why the game suc­ceeded in liv­ing up to the hype (mostly) that broke back­boards in the olden days of 1993.