Nightmare come true: Elm Street game goes down in flames like Freddy Krueger
with Brandon Beatty
What happens when a now-defunct gaming company partners with a former up-and-coming gaming developer to create a game based on one of the most well-known horror movie characters of all time? I'll tell you: A complete AND absolute Dumpster fire known as A Nightmare on Elm Street.

Published by LJN and developed by Rare, Nightmare on Elm Street has you going one-on-one with Wes Craven's great one Freddy Krueger, known for terrorizing and murdering teenagers in their dreams for a final showdown. The game is a side-scroller that supposedly allows you to search various locations to find Mr. Krueger's bones and burn them in the furnace at Elm Street High. There are some areas that require a key to go inside and gather the bones before you fight him in various forms as an end boss, which makes this an aggravating slog through levels filled with unnecessary armies of enemies.

I played this game and within the first five minutes, I was ready to remove this garbage from my NES, take a hammer and bash it to pieces. The controls are simple but are near useless in fighting off other low-level enemies. Another frustration is that Freddy will come mid-level to attack you with unfair advantages such as underground hands that cut your life energy. After I finally learned Freddy's attacks and won, I turned off my NES questioning how LJN got licensed by NOA to make games. The game is sloppy, unnecessarily hard, and has all the makings of a tie-in cash grab based on a popular property that should have stayed unmade.

Folks, do yourself a favor and do not play this game. If you have the original cartridge, research its collector value on Ebay or add it to your horror movie collection. Shame on you, LJN and Rare, for this rip-off. I join the legion of gamers who will riot against gaming companies taking hard-earned coins and producing garbage like this.

Forget you, LJN and Rare.

Brandon Beatty is editor-at-large of Gaming Insurrection. He can be reached by email at brandonb@gaminginsurrection.com